Skip navigation
All People > Thomas3.20.2010 > Thomas3.20.2010 Blog > 2016 > April
2016

Sharon (Smorgy) told us last week about how her Quit Journey taught her to Love Herself. Here is something else that my Quit Journey taught me. I'll bet you have your own stories of unEXpected growth. I hope you share your story!

 I Learned to take chances in a positive way

Every new experience is a learning experience that can build self esteem. When I quit smoking I learned that I can successfully make radical life transforming changes that are for the better!I even learned that I can sometimes make mistakes in the process and nevertheless be successful in the end. I didn't have to choose perfectly in order to be good enough!

Getting out of my comfort zone is, well, uncomfortable. Like most people I know, I feel anxiety whenever I am about to take a chance and try something new. In the past this anxiety and fear, stressed me out to the point that I  avoided trying anything new. I lived by the adage, "if it ain't broke don't fix it" or as my Grandma used to say, "let sleeping dogs lie."

Well, my smoking world became broken literally beyond repair the day I was diagnosed with COPD  but not beyond hope! The only hope I had/have is to keep my COPD from getting worse!Failure was not an option - so I did whatever it took to succeed! And the FREEDOM voice in me broke through!

Right at 100 days quit, (you can ask just about anybody who'se been there - an EXtremely vulnerable time in many a quit journey, including mine), at the height of the recession, I like so many other people was laid off! I was 52 years old at the time - a statistic that did not bode well! Did I think of smoking as a 'solution?' - YOU BET! But I didn't smoke - right when everybody around me who were also laid off were smoking like chimneys! My boss even had the indecency to leave her pack of sickerettes right under my nose for an entire shift! But I had learned - Breath or Death and chose N.O.P.E. to smoking and death!

Surprisingly, I remained EXceedingly calm! I had already successfully made an even bigger change  in my life - I would sail through this one as well! It's amazing when one is faced with their own mortality, what the human being is capable of! Finding another job is a picnic in comparison, right?

So for the second time in 25 years I was thrown into the job market! I had learned something about myself, though! When I set my mind to the possible, nothing is impossible! I searched not in the same field of work (which was obviously vulnerable to lay-offs in that economy and compromising to my lung health on top of it) but in entirely new fields that were less vulnerable. I chose health care which I had never in my life even imagined! Within 3 weeks I had been offered 3 jobs and accepted 2, a part time and a full time job in order to decide which if either would fit for me!

I soon quit the part time job and took on the full time work in an assisted living facility. Within one year, I was promoted to manager and to this day, work at the same facility. I really enjoy my job and my life!

For me, it was not only that I was "successful" in my attempt to find work, it was the act of attempting  which  benefited me most in boosting my self esteem.

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

- Mark Twain

Amazingly, once I in fact got past my fears and took the chance to quit smoking, change my job choice, learn computer, join a blogging site (yes, BecomeanEX was my first ever blogging site!), become active in exercise programs and workouts, (well, as you see, I could go on and on about the changes I've made in my life!) my initial reaction was - "I wish I had tried that sooner but better now than never!".

"Knowing others is intelligence; knowing yourself is true wisdom. Mastering others is strength; mastering yourself is true power."

- Lao-Tzu

 Life is about taking chances. Everyday we take chances. Sometimes we are blissfully unaware of the chances we are taking. Other times, it is painfully obvious. For me, jumping out of my comfort zone and "waking those sleeping dogs up" all started with my quit journey! Life just gets Better and Better with every step I take down this path of RECOVERY!

I wonder what Grandma would say to that!

You remember those funny American Legacy Commercials?

I may not have Quit when I saw them but I knew where to come when I did Quit!

http://www.funnyplace.org/stream/becomeanex-org-drive-13539/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yWTRiI8NsQA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lf01Ti6bH8U

We all have had Addictive Thoughts! The difficulty isn't when we have Addictive Thoughts.The problem comes when we believe our thoughts are true and that we must follow those commands to smoke! We become fused with the thoughts running through our heads! We don't step back and get a better perspective!

And fighting our thoughts or pushing them down just doesn't work! Don't think of a purple Zebra! It can't be done! You can try but the more you try not to think of purple Zebras the more they multiply like bunny rabbits in our brains!

But we can ask ourselves some necessary questions about this thought:

- Is the thought true?

- Is the the thought important?

- is the thought helpful?

Do I really "need" a Sickerette? In the scheme of things will smoking be the most important thing I can do? How will smoking really help me?

Then you can choose to hold onto that thought or to just imagine it in a balloon and let it float away! Then when you focus on something else you are not still clinging to the "I need a Sickerette" thought! You had this thought as well as thousands of thoughts today but that's all it was - just a thought! It isn't true. It isn't important. And it certainly isn;t helpful so I can think about something else that is! I choose to think about my Granddaughter! I get Miss Penny's picture out and look at her Dear little smile and I know that she is TRUE, IMPORTANT, and very, very HELPFUL! Who would want to contaminate her prescious environment? Certainly not this Grandpa!

Smoking is never the correct answer! It's just a thought - let it go!

image

....I'm tired! I need a Sickerette!

Ridiculous!

N.O.P.E.

N.E.F.

S.I.N.A.O.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'm tired! I need some Sleep!

Same goes for Hungry, Angry, Lonely!

- Smoking is never the correct answer! 

Ask yourself what a Non-Smoker thinks! We are THEM!

No, I haven't relapsed!

But I have gotten very tired. Remember H.A.L.T.? Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired?

I'm tired! Soooooo tired!

Mblizzle caught me at the right time and shook me up! I've been playing around in my head with Junkie Thinking! 

At the same time I've stayed away from actual contact with Sickerettes! I know it would be cuckoo to throw my Quit away! 

But it might have happened had I not read this Blog this Day! I would have created the circumstances for myself to just accidentally have access to Sickerettes when "I just can't resist!"

Blessedly, I can resist! I can set myself straight - NOW - before I make the mistake I would dread! I am in charge of my Life - not Nicotine!

There are only two Paths I'm aware of - the Path of Recovery or the Path of Relapse! Time to get on the Path of Recovery! Time to recommit to Recovery!

image

A good night's sleep is a Great Place to begin!

I got myself here and I will get myself back on Mental Track!

Not One Puff Ever!

image

I didn’t wait around for a magic Day of being ready. I didn’t just wake up one Day and say, “Finally, I’m ready!” It doesn’t just drop out of the sky on you!

You have to get ready!

Whether for Health reasons, Control reasons, or just plain tired of being nagged at  - most of us have to prepare our Quititude in order to launch a Successful Quit!

Going from Addictive Thinking to Quititude takes EFFORT! It means committing to learning more about Nicotine Addiction and Recovery! I used to think that I was an Expert on Nicotine Addiction – I was an Addict! Who better to know Addiction?

Well, here’s the catch! Addicts have had their Brains hijacked by their Substance of Choice – in our case – Nicotine! We have junkie thinking! We can find a million and one reasons why we’re not ready to Quit Smoking – at least – Today! Maybe, tomorrow! Probably not – I’m just not ready, yet!

I don’t believe that smoking is truly as harmful as the media and health community say it is.

-          Without question, smoking causes significant harm. This is one of the most well-researched areas in healthcare and the odds are stacked so high against a smoker that it is unquestionable that continued smoking can have disastrous personal consequences.

 I know that smoking is harmful, but I don’t believe that it is harmful to me.

-          Try weighing the costs of smoking against the benefits you receive.…Economically you can’t possibly doubt that smoking is costing you a boatload of Money!  Think a minute about your personal hygiene! What about the second hand smoke you Expose your Family to? That’s just a beginning of things to think about!

 I enjoy smoking too much to quit.

-          What is it you enjoy? Dopamine can come from many sources. Smoking doesn’t really relieve stress – it causes it!

 

 I’m addicted to smoking and am worried that I’ll fail if I try to quit. …

-          Quitting Smoking will be just as hard as you make it! We’re here to show you how to quit successfully with the least amount of discomfort!

I  don’t know how to quit. …

-          We are where you wish to be! We can provide the know how and the support that will help you reach your goal the First Time you make a real effort! This may be the first and last time you’ll ever have to Quit Smoking! The decision is yours!

 I don’t have the willpower to quit. …

-           Quitting smoking is not about willpower. It’s about setting a goal, committing yourself to putting a plan in place to reach that goal, and creating conditions where you are more likely to succeed than not. Willpower is nice, but a plan is better.

I tried quitting before and it didn’t work!

-          You are not alone! Many of us have been Serial Quitters, too – Myself included! But we didn’t have the knowledge and support that BecomeanEx offers! I joined 6 Years ago and I succeeded the first time since I joined after dozens of “failures” in the past! I worked the plan, I participated, I shared – and I succeeded! You can, too!

I might get grumpy. I might gain weight, I might lose Friends, yadayadayada…….

We have the answers to these and a million and two “reasons”!

You don’t have to commit to the whole enchilada today! Just commit to coming here daily and READ, READ, READ!!!!! Listen and Learn!

You will Find your Quititude!

Thomas3.20.2010

Job Prospects

Posted by Thomas3.20.2010 Apr 14, 2016

I'm contemplating looking for a job so when I came across this article I was very happy to be a 6 Year EXer! If you're still smoking maybe you can add this to your list of why to Quit! Today is a Great Day to LIVE Smoke FREE!

Smoking May Be Hazardous to Job Prospects

Job seekers who smoke are less likely to find employment

Unemployed smokers have a harder time finding work than job seekers who don't smoke, and they earn less than nonsmokers when the do become employed, researchers reported.

Nonsmokers who were not employed when they entered the study were 30% more likely than unemployed smokers to have found jobs a year later, in one of the first prospective, observational examinations of the economic burden of smoking on employment.

Smokers who did find work earned an average of $5 less an hour than the nonsmokers who were reemployed during the study: $15.10 per hour compared with $20.27, wrote researcher Judith Prochaska, PhD, of Stanford University, California, in JAMA Internal Medicine, published online April 11.

The researchers followed 251 job seekers in San Francisco for a year, recruited at two employment development centers, in an effort to determine if their smoking status impacted the likelihood that they would find work.

Even after controlling for multiple variables that might influence reemployment, such as education, health status, and age, smokers were 24% less likely to find jobs over the 12-month period than nonsmokers.

"Our findings suggest that unemployed people may be an important group to target with regard to (smoking cessation) efforts," Prochaska told MedPage Today. "We have known for some time that tobacco is very bad for smokers' physical health, and this shows an important impact on financial well being as well."

Earlier studies from Prochaska and colleagues and others conducted in the U.S. and Europe have consistently shown higher rates of unemployment among smokers, compared with nonsmokers, but most of these studies have been cross-sectional, "leaving it undetermined as to whether smoking is a cause or effect of unemployment," the researchers wrote.

The latest study included 131 current smokers and 120 nonsmokers who were all unemployed and looking for work in the San Francisco Bay Area between mid-September of 2013 and mid-August of 2015.

      
  • SAVESAVED
  •   
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •   
  •    
           
  •   
  •  

 

      
  • Activate MedPage Today's CME feature and receive free CME credit on Medical stories like this one.

    ACTIVATE CME
  
   
    
     

Action Points

    
    
     
          
  •  
  •       
  •  
  •      
     
           
    
   
  
  

Unemployed smokers have a harder time finding work than job seekers who don't smoke, and they earn less than nonsmokers when the do become employed, researchers reported.

  

Nonsmokers who were not employed when they entered the study were 30% more likely than unemployed smokers to have found jobs a year later, in one of the first prospective, observational examinations of the economic burden of smoking on employment.

  

Smokers who did find work earned an average of $5 less an hour than the nonsmokers who were reemployed during the study: $15.10 per hour compared with $20.27, wrote researcher Judith Prochaska, PhD, of Stanford University, California, in JAMA Internal Medicine, published online April 11.

  

The researchers followed 251 job seekers in San Francisco for a year, recruited at two employment development centers, in an effort to determine if their smoking status impacted the likelihood that they would find work.

  

Even after controlling for multiple variables that might influence reemployment, such as education, health status, and age, smokers were 24% less likely to find jobs over the 12-month period than nonsmokers.

  

"Our findings suggest that unemployed people may be an important group to target with regard to (smoking cessation) efforts," Prochaska told MedPage Today. "We have known for some time that tobacco is very bad for smokers' physical health, and this shows an important impact on financial well being as well."

  

Earlier studies from Prochaska and colleagues and others conducted in the U.S. and Europe have consistently shown higher rates of unemployment among smokers, compared with nonsmokers, but most of these studies have been cross-sectional, "leaving it undetermined as to whether smoking is a cause or effect of unemployment," the researchers wrote.

  

The latest study included 131 current smokers and 120 nonsmokers who were all unemployed and looking for work in the San Francisco Bay Area between mid-September of 2013 and mid-August of 2015.

  

"Owing to the study's observational design, a propensity score analysis was conducted using inverse probability weighting with trimmed observations," the researchers wrote.

  

Close to 66% of the study participants were men, with a mean (SD) age of 48 years (11), and 38% of the participants were white, 36% were black, 9.6% were Hispanic, and 7.2% were Asian.

  

Just under a third (31.1%) had college degrees, 39.4% were unstably housed, 27.9% lacked reliable transportation, 20.7% had a criminal history, and 28.7% had received prior treatment for alcohol or drug abuse.

  

A year after enrollment, 55.6% of nonsmokers were reemployed, compared with 26.6% of the smokers (adjusted risk difference, 0.20; 95% CI 0.15-0.42).

  
     
  

Propensity scoring (PS) was used to "mitigate confounding and investigate the main causal hypothesis of interest."

  
       
  • SAVESAVED
  •    
  •  
  •    
  •  
  •    
  •  
  •    
  •     
             
  •    
  •  
  •   
  

 

  
       
  • Activate MedPage Today's CME feature and receive free CME credit on Medical stories like this one.

    ACTIVATE CME
  •   
     
   
    
     
      

Action Points

     
     
      
           
  •  
  •        
  •  
  •       
      
             
     
    
   
   

Unemployed smokers have a harder time finding work than job seekers who don't smoke, and they earn less than nonsmokers when the do become employed, researchers reported.

   

Nonsmokers who were not employed when they entered the study were 30% more likely than unemployed smokers to have found jobs a year later, in one of the first prospective, observational examinations of the economic burden of smoking on employment.

   

Smokers who did find work earned an average of $5 less an hour than the nonsmokers who were reemployed during the study: $15.10 per hour compared with $20.27, wrote researcher Judith Prochaska, PhD, of Stanford University, California, in JAMA Internal Medicine, published online April 11.

   

The researchers followed 251 job seekers in San Francisco for a year, recruited at two employment development centers, in an effort to determine if their smoking status impacted the likelihood that they would find work.

   

Even after controlling for multiple variables that might influence reemployment, such as education, health status, and age, smokers were 24% less likely to find jobs over the 12-month period than nonsmokers.

   

"Our findings suggest that unemployed people may be an important group to target with regard to (smoking cessation) efforts," Prochaska told MedPage Today. "We have known for some time that tobacco is very bad for smokers' physical health, and this shows an important impact on financial well being as well."

   

Earlier studies from Prochaska and colleagues and others conducted in the U.S. and Europe have consistently shown higher rates of unemployment among smokers, compared with nonsmokers, but most of these studies have been cross-sectional, "leaving it undetermined as to whether smoking is a cause or effect of unemployment," the researchers wrote.

   

The latest study included 131 current smokers and 120 nonsmokers who were all unemployed and looking for work in the San Francisco Bay Area between mid-September of 2013 and mid-August of 2015.

   

"Owing to the study's observational design, a propensity score analysis was conducted using inverse probability weighting with trimmed observations," the researchers wrote.

   

Close to 66% of the study participants were men, with a mean (SD) age of 48 years (11), and 38% of the participants were white, 36% were black, 9.6% were Hispanic, and 7.2% were Asian.

   

Just under a third (31.1%) had college degrees, 39.4% were unstably housed, 27.9% lacked reliable transportation, 20.7% had a criminal history, and 28.7% had received prior treatment for alcohol or drug abuse.

   

A year after enrollment, 55.6% of nonsmokers were reemployed, compared with 26.6% of the smokers (adjusted risk difference, 0.20; 95% CI 0.15-0.42).

   
       
   

Propensity scoring (PS) was used to "mitigate confounding and investigate the main causal hypothesis of interest."

   

"We conducted an inverse probability weight (IPW) analysis with trimmed observations, where the weight was the inverse (i.e., reciprocal) of the PS: The smoking and nonsmoking groups were weighted so as to be similar (on average) to each other in baseline characteristics," the researchers wrote.

   

With 6% of the analysis sample observations trimmed, the researchers estimated that nonsmokers were 30% (95% CI 12%-48%) more likely than smokers, on average, to be reemployed a year after enrollment.

   

"Results of a sensitivity analysis with additional covariates of sex, stable housing, reliable transportation, criminal history, and prior treatment for alcohol or drug use (25.3% of observations trimmed) reduce the difference in employment attributed to smoking status to 24% (95% CI 7%-39%), which was still a significant difference," the researchers wrote.

   

They cited as study limitations the exclusion criteria and sample size, which "while powered for the main outcome, did not allow for tests of association within career clusters." The study location -- in a city where there is very low smoking prevalence and a probable high stigma related to smoking -- may also have limited the generalizability of the findings.

   

In an editorial published with the study, JAMA Internal Medicine deputy editor Mitchell Katz, MD, of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, also cited the study location as a potential limitation, but he added the researchers' estimate, after rigorous adjustment, of a 24% increase in employment associated with smoking cessation has important implications.

   

"Support for smoking cessation, including referral for cessation medications, should be a standard part of employment counseling," he wrote. "For smokers seeking employment, we can add another motivation for quitting to all the health and longevity benefits of cessation: increased likelihood of finding a job."

   

In her interview with MedPage Today, Prochaska agreed that the identification of employment counseling centers as potentially valuable partners in smoking cessation efforts is a major study finding.

   

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pulmonology/Smoking/57297

  

...and Positivity generates Positivity!

Get on the right track in this moment! Do something small such as smile!

Write down three blessings you experienced today

Or give a loved one a hug!

Think of 1 thing you like about yourself

Or remind yourself of something you feel proud of!

I see way too many people here who constantly beat themselves up and/or practice dangerous habits such as hanging out in smoking environments or taking trips in a car with their smoking friends. They think that they're being generous when in fact, they're literally playing with fire!

A good EXer says no to placing themselves in those situations. They even have the self confidence to ask their Family and Friends to not smoke around them! Exers make no EXcuses for bad behavior - they look to secure their quits by reinforcing their own good behavior!

Smoking is more than a bad habit - it's an Addiction!

And quitting is more than not smoking - it's Recovery! 

Do you really want to quit? How bad? 

Start right this minute by being KIND to you!

I stop, breathe, refocus, and move on.

What do you do?

Thomas3.20.2010

Gearing Up to Quit!

Posted by Thomas3.20.2010 Apr 5, 2016

image

 

 

When you gear up for a Quit what do you think of?

My guess is patches, gum, lozenges, Chantix, and e-cigarettes.

You’ve left out some of the most important items you’ll need!

There are a few things you’ll need from the store – the grocery store, that is! Cranberry juice and fresh veggies come to mind. Don’t forget dark chocolate!  Also drinking straws and maybe, rubber bands. Cut your straws in half and breathe through them to practice delaying before you quit. Some folks here have found this little substitute very helpful!

There are more ideas in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kOMX5vPldI

Then there are some mental preparations you will need to do, too! Not the old white knuckle pep talk! Just keeping a diary or journal of when you smoke and what precipitated it! Learn your triggers! There’s a whole section right here:

http://www.becomeanex.org/track-your-cigarettes.php

Plus you’ll want to practice quitting! So how do you practice quitting when you haven’t yet quit? Try delaying that ext Sickerette for 10 minutes…and then another ten…and again…. Learn to ride the crave wave instead of forcing yourself against it!

https://excommunity.becomeanex.org/blogs/Thomas3.20.2010-blog/2015/10/09/the-push-and-pull

Do you like to do crafts? Get some woodworking supplies, gardening stuff, yarn for knitting, paint, or whatever supplies you need for your favorite craft. You’ll want to stay busy while you’re riding those waves!  If it’s something you’re passionate about – even better! You can also start a craft that you’ve never done before – learn German or play the guitar!

Do you like to exercise! Terrific! Keep those workout supplies handy and use them!

The most important thing you need is right there – between your ears! Gear up your brain with positive self talk! The more you believe that “This will be the hardest thing I’ve ever done!’ the more true the statement! You don’t have to think this way! Stay focused and determined, be prepared and you’ll find that it’s a little uncomfortable but I can do it!

https://excommunity.becomeanex.org/blogs/Thomas3.20.2010-blog/2015/05/13/addictive-thoughts

Not what you were expecting? Well, all of these ideas are tried and true and will lead to a smoother, more successful quit! And that’s why we’re here in the first place!

Gear up for SUCCESS!

image

 

So I found a car – a Honda CR-V gently used as they say!

That’s when I began looking at the car insurance I have been carrying for Years and discovered that I’d been paying way too much! So I went Insurance shopping! One thing led to another and I also changed Credit Cards for a lower interest rate and other financial reorganization.

But that’s not all! I have reworked my job schedule! That’s why I haven’t been here much! I’ve been working 80 hours a week while in transition! As of today though things are more settled and back down to a reasonable 50 hours/week. So I’m back here more often.

Transitions can be tough. We abruptly find ourselves out of our comfort zone. It takes time for this new pattern of lifestyle to become more natural. In my instance I have to even adjust my sleep/wake patterns to accommodate my new work schedule. But I know that in the long run it will be more rewarding and better for me and for my Family. I will be more equipped to handle my other goals – like spending more time with my Granddaughter!

When I was a smoker I leaned on my Addiction to Nicotine to get me through tough times like these. I would find myself increasing tobacco use while I familiarized myself with the changes going on. That’s because challenges go smoother if you have dopamine – the feel good hormone - going on and Nicotine artificially produces dopamine in our Brains!

 But when you quit smoking that crutch is gone and yes, quitting is a drastic lifestyle change. It messes with your concentration, sleep patterns, even depression and anxiety temporarily. Dopamine boosts our drive, focus, and concentration so it’s no wonder that when we stop producing it through Addiction we don’t feel so great – at first!

Dopamine enables us to plan ahead and resist impulses so we can achieve our goals which is EXactly what we need when we launch a Quit Journey! It gives us that “I did it!” lift when we accomplish what we set out to do. In other words, Dopamine is in charge of our pleasure-reward system. It allows us to have feelings of enjoyment, bliss, and even euphoria.

But too little dopamine can leave you unfocused, unmotivated, lethargic, and even depressed. We run the risk of low dopamine levels when we Quit Smoking which makes it tough to succeed! That’s where Knowledge is Power!

 

So what can you do? While searching for your New Normal there are many ways to get that dopamine that have nothing to do with Nicotine. Use as many as you can and you’ll find the transition into EXer much less difficult!

Here’s a list of foods, drinks, and spices known to increase dopamine:

·        all animal products

·        almonds

·        apples

·        avocado

·        bananas

·        beets

·        chocolate

·        coffee

·        fava beans

·        green leafy vegetables

·        green tea

·        lima beans

·        oatmeal

·        sea vegetables

·        sesame and pumpkin seeds

·        turmeric

·        watermelon

·        wheat germ

Foods high in natural probiotics such as yogurt, kefir, and raw sauerkraut can also increase natural dopamine production.

Exercise also raises baseline levels of dopamine by promoting the growth of new brain cell receptors. Along with natural pain-killing endorphins, dopamine is responsible in part for “runner’s high.” But you don’t need to exercise strenuously to enhance your brain.

Taking walks, or doing gentle, no-impact exercises like yoga, tai chi, or qi gong all provide powerful mind-body benefits. 

Meditation increases dopamine, improving focus and concentration.

Creative hobbies of all kinds — knitting, quilting, sewing, drawing, photography, woodworking, and home repair — bring the brain into a meditative state.

These activities increase dopamine, ward off depression, and protect against brain aging.

Listening to music can cause release of dopamine.

Oddly, you don’t even have to hear music to get this neurotransmitter flowing. Just the anticipation of listening can do that.

Dopamine is released when we achieve our goals. But having only long-term goals gets frustrating, so set both short-term and long-term goals. Celebrate your Days of Freedom. Set aside the cash you would have spent on Sickerettes and treat yourself. Break up your long-term goal of Living Smoke FREE into small short-term goals to give yourself dopamine boosts along the way.

Take small steps toward Recovery every day. Working on your goal without fail for 45 days will train your brain to stimulate dopamine production in a new way.

No nicotine required!

Healthy ways to produce dopamine include eating the right foods, taking dopamine boosting supplements, physical exercise, and meditation.

Learn how to harness your reward system for a healthy stream of dopamine.

Enjoy the quest, set both long-term and short-term goals, and take on new challenges.

You’ll feel more alive, focused, productive, and motivated.

I have lots of dopamine flowing naturally these days! I walk an average of 10 miles a day at work. I practice cardio, strength training, yoga and pilates. I have new hobbies. I eat more healthy than ever. And I meditate.

All these goals I’ve set for myself don’t feel overwhelming – they’re delightful! I get a natural “high” from working hard, earning, paying and saving money.

This is one Spring Cleaning I’m enjoying!