Skip navigation
All People > Giulia > Giulia's Blog > 2011 > July
2011

" />

Giulia

Preventable Death

Posted by Giulia Champion Jul 11, 2011

In case you missed this, check out the following.  I bolded the most important parts (to my mind in the piece). 

"tobacco remains the biggest cause of preventable death worldwide" 

Please stop smoking.  Please keep trying.  Don't give up.  You CAN get there.  Just hang in.  It's so important for you to do so.  'Cause smoking WILL killl you...eventually.

 

Smoking bans on the rise but more needed: WHO

AFPBy Ana Ines Cibils | AFP – Thu, Jul 7, 2011

  
   
    

Related Content

   
   
    
         
  • A no smoking sign is seen at a bus terminal in Manila on July 1. Anti-smoking measures have become so widespread that they now affect some 3.8 billion people -- just over half the world's population, the World Health Organization said Thursday

    A no smoking sign is seen at a bus terminal in Manila on July 1. Anti-smoking measures …

  •      
  • Romanian women smoke outside the headquarters of a bank in Bucharest in June 2011. The World Health Organization warns that tobacco use could kill a billion people or more over the course of the 21st century "unless urgent action is taken

    Romanian women smoke outside the headquarters of a bank in Bucharest in June 2011. …

  •     
   
  
  
   

Anti-smoking measures have become so widespread that they now affect some 3.8 billion people -- just over half the world's population, the World Health Organization said Thursday.

   

But the WHO called for more action, warning that tobacco use could kill a billion people or more over the course of the 21st century "unless urgent action is taken."

   

"If current trends continue, by 2030 tobacco will kill more than eight million people worldwide each year, with 80 percent of these premature deaths among people living in low- and middle-income countries," it added.

   

The WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic was launched in Uruguay as the health body sought to highlight the country's legislation against smoking that now faces a lawsuit by tobacco giant Philip Morris.

   

"The tobacco epidemic continues to expand because of ongoing tobacco industry marketing, population growth in countries where tobacco use is increasing, and the extreme addictiveness of tobacco that makes it difficult for people to stop smoking once they start," said Ala Alwan, WHO assistant director-general for noncommunicable diseases and mental health.

   

He noted that tobacco remains the biggest cause of preventable death worldwide, killing nearly six million people and costing hundreds of billions of dollars in economic damage each year.

   

Health warnings on cigarette packs protect more than a billion people in 19 countries, almost double the figures over the past two years, according to the report.

   

It said graphic ads were more effective than those only containing text, especially in countries with low literacy rates, and recommended that images be changed periodically to ensure they have an impact.

   

The size of the warning also has an effect, and the WHO noted that Uruguay had the largest images on cigarette packs, covering 80 percent of the surface, followed by Mexico (65 percent) and Mauritius (also 65 percent).

   

In Canada, the first country to introduce large health warnings on cigarette packs in 2001, three out of 10 former smokers said they were motivated to quit by the labels while a quarter said they helped them quit, according to the report.

   

Similar trends were also noted in Australia, Brazil, Singapore and Thailand.

   

Tobacco advertising and sponsorship, a favorite target of critics, saw comprehensive bans passed in Chad, Colombia and Syria between 2008 and 2010. And nearly 28 percent of the world's population -- 1.9 billion people in 23 countries -- are now exposed to national anti-smoking campaigns.

   

Some 425 million people in 19 countries -- six percent of the world's population -- are now "now fully protected against tobacco industry marketing tactics," 80 million more than in 2008, according to the WHO report.

   

"The number of people now protected by tobacco control measures is growing at a remarkable pace," said Alwan.

   

He attributed the progress to the growing impact of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Entered into force in February 2005, the treaty has 168 signatories and 174 parties.

   

While 101 countries ban tobacco print, television or radio advertising, both direct or indirect, the WHO considers the number to still be insufficient, noting that 74 countries (38 percent) have no or minimal restrictions on advertising.

  

Celebrations are great triggers.  And we can list all the reasons why.  But don't.  List all the reasons, instead, that you're gonna keep your quit on this July 4th.  Are you independent yet? 

Stay focused on your goal.  Don't blow it.  Don't smoke it.  We all need you to stay strong.  There is strength in numbers.

Relapse Traps

The Holiday Trap

Giulia

How Deep is Your Commitment?

Posted by Giulia Champion Jul 1, 2011

This is all Linda's fault with her blog https://excommunity.becomeanex.org/blogs/LindaN_7-14-10-blog/2011/06/23/yes-you-can.

Quitting really is simple.  You stop or you continue smoking.  Two options.  There is no in between when it comes to quitting.  You can't "sort of quit."  You can't stop and then start again and then stop again and start again.  That's not quitting.  That's playing with quitting.  That's attempting to quit.  That what's called "trying."  That is not "doing."  That is not quitting.

Quitting is when you say "enough is enough.  Period. I stop this now.  Now and forever."  And you simply accept  that you're gonna go through a period of adjustment, a period that may not be a whole lot of fun.  But you know when you get to the other side, you'll be fine.  Quitting is about commitment.  How important is it to you to quit?  What are you willing to do to stay smoke free?  How uncomfortable are you willing to feel?  Are you willing to give everything you have to the effort?

You need to sit down and really ask yourself some in-depth questions when you consider this journey.  Because it is a life changing journey.  And it is not an easy one.  But it is one of the most rewarding ones you'll ever have.  I can only speak from my own experience and from reading the many, many posts I've encountered during my five years in support.  And I am only where I am in my particular journey because of the reading I did of people who had more experience than I in the process. 

Some questions I think one needs to ask yourself:
*Why am I here
*What do I want
*What am I willing to do to achieve it
*Is the sacrifice worth the effort
*Am I willing to give it everything I've got
*Is there anything that I believe might be presented in my life that will make me fail at this endeavor - some emotional trauma...

The list of questions that determine your commitment to quitting are endless.  You need to answer them all within yourself with the ultimate answer being, "I will quit no matter what. No matter what life throws at me.  Because quitting is the most important thing in my life.  Living is the most important thing in my life."  And actually, for those of us who have been supporting quitters for a long time - it's one of the most important things in OUR lives.  To see you succeed and become a leader of wisdom in the community.  Your success is our success.  Your winning is our winning.  Your one year anniversary is just about as precious as ours was to us. 

And we know you CAN be free.  It's happening every minute all over this site.  And it's beautiful to see.  So BELIEVE you CAN.  Because - you CAN!

Just quit.  Just...quit.  And LIVE!  to enjoy another Fourth of July.  Or to see another grandchild, or run another race, or....discover the new you who can be just as happy not smoking as you were smoking.  And that's a little miracle that's right around the corner.

With love....

Filter Blog

By date: By tag: